Bridge and Water

While hiking recently in Sedona State Park I came to a small bridge that crosses over Oak Creek. At about the midpoint I sat down and just observed the flow of the water against the fall colors and the bright blue sky. This visual feast was accompanied by the incredible music of the briskly moving water; a perfect combination of elements for a moment of reflection and consideration.

I captured about a minute of the experience on video and invite you to enjoy it for your own purposes. While it’s certainly not the same as being there in person I do think you will find in it a helpful rhythm and flow that may serve to settle you, calm you and perhaps even restore you a little.

You see, I am more convinced than ever – through observation of my own tendencies as much as from what I see in leaders with whom I work – that it is in stopping the action, even for a moment, that we unlock the possibility of new learning.

As you take a moment to experience Oak Creek yourself I invite you to use it in whatever way is most useful to you. Maybe you just need a minute to veg out. Perhaps you are in the grip of a question that gets more knotted the more you struggle with it. Maybe you are hunched at your desk and realize you’ve been holding that same position for the entire day…or week…or year.

Or do you need to simply refresh yourself?

Imagine taking a handful of that moving water, splashing it on your face and waking up again to the absolute power and possibility of your life.

5 thoughts on “Bridge and Water

  1. cannot open this, however your beautifully descriptive words, describe the scene so well I can almost taste it. Deep cleansing breath, fresh clean air and cool clear water trickling down the throat. Wish I was there.

  2. In a book my dad wrote years ago he had a chapter on the need to quiet the phones. It was based on the scripture, “Be still, and know.” “Truth,” he said “is a casualty of our busy world.” And he wrote that book in the early ‘60’s. How much noisier is our world now? Among other things, he quoted the Spanish philosopher Ortega Y Gasset who wrote, “Without a certain margin of tranquility, truth succumbs.” My dad’s words… “For it’s in stillness that life’s sediment settles and the cloudy becomes clear.”

    Great theme. Great story. Great physical “anchor” to aid the process. You’re doing wonderful work my friend. Thanks for sharing.

    Best Always,

    Doug Walker
    Manager, HR Services, Service Operations

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  3. I always enjoy your insights, DB. Random question, but curious minds…as you stood on there in that moment, did you consciously choose which side of the bridge to sit on (facing upstream or downstream)? As I read your story before watching the video, I pictured myself sitting on that bridge over Oak Creek, but in “my story” I was facing the other way and watching the water flow away from me. Upon contemplation, I don’t know one “chooses a side” simply because of the reflection of the sunlight or the direction of the breeze, or if there’s something subconscious that helps us make those choices; facing downstream to see where we’re going, or looking upstream to see where we’ve been – or what’s coming our way. In any case, your reflection was helpful to me in stealing a moment away from the “grind” of the day, and I thank you for that. Looking forward.

    • Thanks so much, Dennis. And what a great question. It didn’t even dawn on me to sit the other way. If I remember correctly the stream was more “active” the direction I was facing, calming and pooling once it passed under the bridge so that is likely why it was my inclination to sit that way. Also, the sun was coming from that direction and it was that contrast that struck me immediately. Also, “where we’re going” vs. “where we’ve been” is such an interesting observation to me…in my context I think I’m facing up to what’s coming at me right now; turning to meet it and enjoying the good parts of having it flow over and around me. I’m grateful for your comments and I’m very pleased to know that you found some respite for reflection on “your story.”

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