#37 – Eat What You Want (It’s your birthday)

Years ago when I was downplaying another birthday as “just another day” and “not a big deal,” a friend suggested otherwise. She said that the day of our birth is inherently important because it is the day we started being us. It matters that we are here and because that wasn’t always so – and will not always be so – it matters when we started!

I haven’t thought about birthdays the same since and I won’t start now because my wife, Theresa’s birthday is today. If she hadn’t shown up on March 9, 1971 the cascade of life events and changes and chance that led us to one another and the life that we have built together as a result, would never have happened.

And for that I know that I am a very lucky guy.

And you’re lucky, too, even if you don’t know her, because the good that she does in small and meaningful ways every day is the kind of good that goes out into the world with quiet potency.

She’ll give you anything you need and help you in any way she can, no questions asked. She gets stuff done. She is loyal. And, no pushover, she is fierce.

On Sunday afternoon she was making crêpes at the stove. She makes the batter from scratch and then, one at a time, turns out a soft, golden brown, perfectly cooked crêpe.

I said, “Why are you making crêpes?”

“Because I want to,” she said. “And I’ll probably eat them on my birthday.”

C’est ma fille!


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Do It Anyway

“The opposite of love is not hate, it’s indifference. The opposite of art is not ugliness, it’s indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it’s indifference. And the opposite of life is not death, it’s indifference.”
― Elie Wiesel


It’s a huge risk to love. Do it anyway. Do it completely, fully, unabashedly. Fall head over heels in love with being in love.

It’s a huge risk to create. Do it anyway. Do it with no regard for failure or comparison or regard for the opinions of others. Do it because you just can’t help it.

It’s a huge risk to believe. Do it anyway. Do it with kindness, confidence and respect; do it in anticipation of the meaningful conversations people of deep beliefs can and should have with one another, regardless of something as easy as ‘agreement.’

It’s a huge risk to live. Do it anyway. Do it with vigor and presence. Do it out loud and quietly. Do it with intensity, lightly held, and generosity, freely given. Do it because this is the time you are alive and everything, everything depends on you doing so as fully as you can.


DAVID BERRY is the author of “A More Daring Life: Finding Voice at the Crossroads of Change” and the founder of RULE13 Learning. He speaks and writes about the complexity of leading in a changing world. Connect with him on Twitter at @berrydavid.